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GYPSY MOTH SUMMER: A Novel ~Julia Fierro

June 26th, 2017

GYPSY MOTH SUMMER is being praised as the must read of the summer of 2017.  I have seen lots of promotional material for the book and was looking forward to having an opportunity to read and review this book as presented by TLC Book Tours . The Huffington Post was truly wrapping lots of energy around this highly anticipated book.

I jumped right into the read and it compelled me to stick with the book from cover to cover.  I just knew that somehow this story was not going to end well, and then again maybe I was hoping that it was not going to end well for the people on Avalon Island – the wealthy and the poor.  The story is a tragedy.

I knew many of these character types and I lived through this period of time with great awareness and a budding interest in ecological studies.  I was beginning to understand pollution and how cycles of problems exist and I lived through several Tent Caterpillar infestations and could hear the squish, crackle of walking on the creatures under my feet and know the sticky goo that stuck to everything; really creepy was the critters falling onto your hair and body.

I need to back up here and outline the story of the island people and their sordid, limited view of the world.  Many characters were introduced and before and after each chapter there was information about the Gypsy Moth’s life cycle and years of infestation.  How they marked the world in a very disgusting and filthy pattern.  Because the island was experiencing an infestation throughout the story, which paralleled the slimy behaviors of the community, I did not enjoy the read as much as I thought I would.

About THE GYPSY MOTH SUMMER:

“The summer the Gypsy Moths descended, an even more toxic pest was spreading its way through the people of Avalon. East Avalon is the upper crust, built with generations of military engineers who had exchanged their Navy whites and blues for suits and offices, while West Avalon families hailed from generations of factory workers.

In the summer of 1992, Maddie LaRosa tries to figure out how to survive high school and its queen bee, Bitsy, and worries about maintaining her East Avalon persona and picture-perfect family life. Meanwhile, Leslie Day Marshall, daughter of Avalon Island’s most established wasp-y monarch, has just moved back home with her husband, Jules, who is black, and their kids. Their move from a one bedroom apartment in “the City” to “The Castle” isn’t as big as the change from the melting pot of New York City to the homogeneity of East Avalon. Jules and Leslie’s presence triggers tensions, romances, and unusual alliances that simmer all summer and lead to violence that leaves the community atomized forever.

Diving deep into research on gypsy moths, Fierro was inspired by her own childhood on Long Island, and the tensions that exist in a community where there are two economically different sides of town. Also included in her acute observations are the political tensions of 1992 during a different Clinton campaign and the rise in cancer rates due to the community’s water pollution. Grounded in real events, Fierro’s writes an intense and engrossing story that will stick with you long after the tragic ending.”    (From the promotional materials)

The teenagers in the story were the same unhappy, drunken, drugging, sniffing, nasty behavior laden kids I knew back then and tried to stay away.  They felt so entitled and are still acting entitled as they move into the Medicare years.  They still deny climate problems and toxic waste sites.  They feel they can just purchase their way out of everything.  Fierro wrote about them with brilliance and they were awful in the story as they were in person.  The sad thing is that they have been trying to lead the world now and be the leaders because they are “rich” and they are just as awful to encounter today as they were.  I still attempt to stay away but they keep trying to damage health care, public schools, and destroy social programs – they want to make money from schools and prisons and they truly do not care about human beings.

The story is very bright and capable and does keenly capture a segment of our community and wrap them in Moth slime tying them up smartly in a bow.  It was my pleasure to finish reading the book and be done with it.  GYPSY MOTH SUMMER left me wondering how to help people change and want to live by kindness.  There was no attempt to illuminate the future in GYPSY MOTH SUMMER.

“Fierro doesn’t just observe, she knows. Like all great novelists, she gives us the world.” – Amy Bloom, bestselling author of Away and Lucky Us

About the Author:

“JULIA FIERRO is the founder of The Sackett Street Writers’ Workshop, a creative home to more than 4,000 writers in New York City, Los Angeles and online. Her first novel CUTTING TEETH, was praised by The Boston Globe (“at once modern and timeless”) and The New Yorker (“a comically energetic début”).

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AMONG THE LESSER GODS: A Novel ~Margo Catts

June 19th, 2017

AMONG THE LESSER GODS was a story I enjoyed reading very much.  The writing was clear and the story straightforward as it explores the ‘blame game’ and how blame changes the lives of individuals and the surrounding characters and community.  We begin at the end of university in California for Elena Alvarez and a gap year arranged by her Grandmother in Colorado; space to figure out what comes next.

Elena has been living a very tense life with lots of adversity.  As a child, she accidentally set a deadly fire and this caused her family great disruption and a great deal of blame.  Her mother abandoned her and she has led a life of blaming herself and now finds herself pregnant and no plans for life ahead.  Her Grandmother has found her a volunteer job caring for two young children who have lost their mother to a car accident while the father figures out all the changes he will need to make and still accomplish a living wage; long haul trucking is no longer a working option.  Elena’s Grandmother has a permanent house in Leadville, but choses to live in the Ghost Town where she reared her children and lost one.  The family is full of mystery and unknown factors.

Elena who is mathematical and scientific is not sure about caring for children and yet her conversations with them are magical and revealing allowing the story to unfold in a gracious connection.  The community is a place with lots of adversity as the mining company is slowing down and evolving into new directions.  The characters unfold the realities behind the adversities and the strength of character and community bonding is a boon to self – discovery.  The mysteries are compassionately uncovered.  What a good story and first novel and yes I have to agree with other quotes – I want to read Catts’ next book for sure.  The power of listening – potent answers are uncovered.  AMOUNG THE LESSER GODS has the power of redemption.

“Margo Catts has a sharp eye for the intricacies of family, love, and tragedy. In luminous prose, she deftly explores the impact of the past upon our lives. This is a heartfelt book that will break your heart at times and at others fill you with joy.” — Daniel Robinson, author of After the Fire

TLC Book Tours review book

About the Author:

Margo Catts grew up in Los Angeles and has since lived in Utah, Indiana, and Colorado. After raising three children in the U.S., she and her husband moved to Saudi Arabia, where her Foreign Girl blog was well known in the expat community. Originally a freelance editor for textbooks and magazines, she has also done freelance writing for business, technical, and advertising clients, all the while working on her fiction. She is a contributing author to Once Upon an Expat. Among the Lesser Gods is her first novel. She now lives in Denver, Colorado. (TLC page)

Margo Catts Facebook
Margo Catts Twitter
Margo Catts Web

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WTF Poems ~Laura Foley

June 12th, 2017

WTF is a collection of 18 poems, which are the biography of the author’s father – William T. Foley.  It is the recounting of a life of a WWII POW, doctor, husband, father, and mansion resident high up in New York City.  He is described as a healer not a killer and he enjoyed the respect of other men.

Foley’s words continue to share the sharp treatment of her mother and the contrast of how he robustly denounced his daughters:

DADDY’S GIRLS
He wanted a boy so badly,
he called four girls
a Chinese curse,
blamed our mother,
haunted us, his
unwanted daughters.
Kiss me, he’d insist…
Quickly, we learned to turn away,
duck his gaze,
but still he broke us,
two to madness,
one to meanness,
one to poetry.

I read a poem nearly everyday and I enjoy listening to poems being read aloud on the Writer’s Almanac (Garrison Keillor) on the radio.  I either like a poem or I do not and I like to analyze what I believe was the poet’s intention – just for the fun of it.

This is the third book of poems I have reviewed by Laura Foley and I have enjoyed them all.  One reason that I care for them so much is that Foley has done her homework and emotional companion work; she shares that integration with her writing.  The raw feelings are still evident and they allow the reader to touch into the poem and connect with one’s own emotions without one needing to work that emotion through for the author.  The work has been done and the reader is able to respond cleanly.

Poetic Book Tours sent me a copy of this book for review. WTF – my pleasure.

“Laura Foley is the author of five poetry collections, including Joy Street, Syringa and Night Ringing.  Her poem ‘Gratitude List’ won the Common Good Books poetry contest and was read by Garrison Keillor on The Writer’s Almanac.  She won the Joe Gouveia Outermost Poetry contest, judged by Marge Piercy. A palliative care volunteer in hospitals, she lives with her partner Clara Giménez and their three big dogs among the hills of Vermont.” (Cover)

Laura Foley Web
Laura Foley Facebook
Laura Foley Writer’s Almanac

Related:
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UPSTREAM: A Book of Selected Essays ~Mary Oliver

June 5th, 2017

Mary Oliver beloved poet takes a look at the beauty of the natural world and offers the reader an opportunity to investigate the mysteries and bounties of the world and the world of literature.  UPSTREAM could be a series of lectures that as one reads takes you down the paths her feet have taken and dazzles the senses with the whole adventure.

UPSTREAM is prose with poetic license and glorious word descriptions, which allows the reader to understand life through the experience and to understand how Oliver’s life developed and her worldview was enhanced by the glories of earth and walking through.

UPSTREAM is a meditation on the books and experiences that allowed a child to grow and become; forcing a life to create on it’s own strength, knowledge and power.

“UPSTREAM follows Oliver as she contemplates the pleasure of artistic labor, her boundless curiosity for the flora and fauna that surround her, and the responsibility she has inherited from Shelley, Wordsworth, Emerson, Poe, and Frost, the great thinkers and writers of the past, to live thoughtfully and intelligently, and to observe with passion.  Oliver positions not just herself upstream, but us as well, as she encourages us to keep moving, to lose ourselves in the awe of the unknown, and to give power and time to the creative and whimsical urges that live within us.” (Book Cover)

UPSTREAM is a memoir of the child to the learner, to the writer, to the poet, and to the teacher we so admire and study.

UPSTREAM is a book I purchased for my own library to read, contemplate and enjoy for many years to come.  I wanted to share it with you because it means so very much to me.

“Born in a small town in Ohio, Mary Oliver published her first book of poetry in 1963 at the age of twenty-eight.  Over the course of her long career, she has received numerous awards.  Her fourth book, AMERICAN PRIMITIVE, won the Pulitzer Prize for Poetry in 1984.  She has led workshops and held residencies at various colleges and universities, including Bennington College, where she held the Catharine Osgood Foster Chair for Distinguished Teaching.  Oliver currently lives in Florida”   (Book Cover)

Mary Oliver Wikipedia
Mary Oliver Facebook
On Being Interview with Mary Oliver entitled “Listening to the World”

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