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BROKEN GOUND: A Novel ~Karen Halvorsen Schreck

Monday, August 1st, 2016

Broken Ground is a wonderful story, which started as a family story and as the author did her research expanded into a reveal about the historic deportations of Mexican Farm Workers from California in the 1930s.  This removal of immigrants was also described as “self-deportation” even when they had been born in the USA and had lived here all of their lives.  It proves to be a difficult story and a tarnished period of our history.  The writing is quite lavish and beautiful.

The story is about Ruth Warren a young widow who is finding a way out of the Oklahoma and Texas Dust Bowl with the assistance of her friend the local librarian.  Her life has not been easy and yet she steps onto a train to head west to a new life and a new future.  There is an emotional honesty to the story and the readers may find themselves holding their breath for Ruth’s safety and future.  Poverty and religious traditions keep a firm grasp on her life and the choices she is able to make, and yet she does find a future and hope.

When the character is able to question and is inquisitive there can be hope and resolution.  Change can happen.  The story is inspirational.  Together with her new friends there comes about a promising future.

“Karen Halvorsen Schreck’s novel SING FOR ME received a starred review in Publishers Weekly. Her previous novels include WHILE HE WAS AWAY, a finalist for the 2012 Oklahoma Young Adult Book Award, and DREAM JOURNAL a 2006 Young Adult Book Sense Pick Her short stories have received various awards, including a Pushcart Prize and an Illinois Arts Council Grant.  Karen received her doctorate in English and Creative Writing from the University of Illinois at Chicago.  She lives with her family in Wheaton, Illinois.” (Cover)

Karen Halvorsen Schreck Facebook

Larissa Ackerman | Claire McKinneyPR, LLC sent me a copy of BROKEN GROUND for review.  I am going to pass it on to neighbor right away, because I am sure she will enjoy this read as much as I did. The book already has 43 5 stars reviews on Amazon.

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OLIVAY: A Novel ~Deborah Reed

Thursday, July 23rd, 2015

I was totally captured by OLIVAY.  I was driven to turn every page of OLIVAY.  It was very suspenseful and demanding the reader to find resolution and yet it was not a comfortable read at all.   I am so pleased that TLC Book Tours sent me a copy for review; OLIVAY was a most interesting read.

Deborah Reed teaches writing in Los Angeles and Germany and is an extraordinary writer and storyteller.   I did not wish to miss a word or paragraph for fear of missing some phrase or line of description.   OLIVAY is the main character’s name and it is used often in the story and as she interacts with Henry sometimes you have to guess at who said that line or phrase because it is not crystal clear; either one is possible.

A year earlier OLIVAY’s husband has been killed in an accident while on his way to work.  The driver of the vehicle has not been found or arrested.  OLIVAY has been made a media star as the video of her caring for her dead husband has been circulated millions of times.  She is still hard pressed to leave her loft apartment for all the notoriety and she is a very private person.  She has quit her job as an architect and is now just venturing out to a local coffee shop to try and leave her home with out gaping attacks.

At the coffee shop, a handsome young man, Henry, approaches OLIVAY and their conversation lasts all afternoon. She invites him to her loft and he spends the night.   In the morning, there is a terrorist attack upon the neighborhood and the windows are blown out of the loft and OLIVAY has her knee severely injured.  People on the street are dying as the water main ruptures and the electricity shuts down.

Most of the story takes place in the loft as Henry cares for the injury and takes care of OLIVAY, who is trying to figure out the real Henry.   OLIVAY appears to be one of the meanest characters I have ever read, and yet as one reads on there is something very wise about her and her thoughts.  Who is Henry really?

The second section of the story included Henry’s story and more of his thinking in alternate chapters that goes by very quickly.  There is a tension in the telling of the story as revealing as it proves to be.

I do not think I would have picked this book for myself, and once again I thank TLC Book Tours  for sending this gem along and putting it on the schedule.  The writing is amazing and the premise interesting and yet it is something I would not like to experience myself – in any aspect.   I believe it is a book more folks need to read.  The writing is inspiring.

From the book cover:

“Deborah Reed’s novel, Things We Set on Fire, sold over one hundred thousand copies in the first six months, while Carry Yourself Back to Me was a Best Book of 2011 Amazon Editors Pick.  She wrote the bestselling thriller, A Small Fortune, and its sequel, Fortunes Deadly Descent, under her pen name Audrey Braun.  She holds a master’s degree in fine arts in creative writing, and teaches at the UCLA Extension Writing Program.  She is also co-director of the Black Forest Writing Seminar at the University of Freiburg in Germany.  She resides in Los Angeles.”

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