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THE INNKEEPER’S SISTER: A Southern Romance and Historic Mystery Novel ~Linda Goodnight

Tuesday, August 1st, 2017

THE INNKEEPER’S SISTER is certainly a wonderful beach read and I tucked it into my gear for a long weekend of wave watching and page turning.  I am not a great fan of Southern Romance and yet Goodnight’s characters are quite real and not so sticky sweet and the historic mystery was a nice glimpse into the reconstruction period after the Civil War.  (It did not omit that slavery was an issue – thank goodness for that)

About the Author:

“NY Times and USA Bestseller, Linda Goodnight writes novels to touch the heart as well as to entertain. Her emotional stories of hope have won the RITA, the Carol, the Reviewer’s Choice, and numerous other industry awards. A small town girl, Linda remains close to her roots, making her home in rural Oklahoma. She and husband have a blended family of eight, including two teenagers recently adopted from Ukraine. Many of her books are about family and children and rightly so, as she draws her deeply emotional stories from her surroundings, her great love of family, and from personal experiences as a nurse and teacher.” (TLC book tours page)

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THE INNKEEPER’s SISTER is also about recovery after a child has been abducted and how life goes on years later.  Two sisters have purchased an old orchard and have refurbished with skill the house into a stunning bed and breakfast.  This gives them purpose and vision and keeps Julie moving ahead and making new plans.  For Valerie it is not so important to her and she understands the value of the endeavor, but she longed to be a professional dancer and now she cannot move ahead in that direction.  She has started using alcohol to cope with her secrets and continue to hide.

Grayson Blake is a developer and he and his brother find old landmarks to refurbish and turn into 5 star restaurants.   He has come to Honey Ridge and Old Peach Orchard to revitalize an old Mill and develop a new destination restaurant.  The new construction is halted because a pile of bones has been discovered in the basement of the mill near the water wheel.   Grayson stays at the bed and breakfast and reconnects with a high school friend.  Together they find old sheet music that is actually a code that leads to some answers about the mystery and the history of the farm.

The Civil War elements of the story expose the new possibilities for the former slaves and share the details of the farm’s own love story and the role of the house as a hospital for soldiers.  Very interesting.

Over the years of reviewing books, I have read another of Linda Goodnight’s stories and thought it was quite good.  There is a caring quality to the stories and some down to earth good solutions to problems.  Time does not heal all wounds but it is certainly part of the recovery process.

I think many folks will enjoy this story and the gentle touch of the author.

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THE ROBOT SCIENTIST’S DAUGHTER: Poems ~Jeannine Hall Gailey

Friday, April 24th, 2015

“THE ROBOT SCIENTIST’S DAUGHTER gives us a magnificent voice, at turns ‘happy with the apple blossoms,’ and whip-smart enough to know ‘the beauties of voltmeter and oscilloscope.’ But underneath the beautifully measured sheen and spark of these bright stanzas, is a human who opens up thrilling new worlds by also fearlessly inhabiting poems of sorrow, survival, and identity.” –Aimee Nezhukumatathil.

Powerful is one of the first words which comes to mind when I think of THE ROBOT SCIENTIST’S DAUGHTER.  I was so happy to have this book early so I could read a poem each day and come back to it with my mind often to savor the images and recall my own feelings about nuclear families and nuclear reactors of my history and knowledge.

My own family ate the green weeds and flowers of the ground in hopes of growing healthy and cleansing the pesticides and chemicals of the past progresses.  We worshiped the apple blossoms and witnessed the testing of the bombs and the growing cancers right within our core.  There is a tender childhood memoir wrapped within an environmental beauty that we know as our home until it is paved over and rendered dead.

As I live in the State with the most MS anywhere in the world.  As the fossil fuel fogies attempt to destroy the sound waters daily  (oil and water do not mix – I thought everyone knew that?). I pounced on these words and knew them with joy and intimacy wanting to shout out about this experience expressed and the insights shared in each phrase and precise capture; share them with my world and those people of my neighborhood.

This poetry is a positive use of punctuation with readable stop points and a rhythm, which strengthens its form and readability- Intelligent!  It is not so free form as to loose focus and poignancy.

I want to introduce my daughters to this eco-feminism and her fearless words right at this moment as we celebrate Poetry Month and our drought is making known its energy and as we combine to celebrate Earth Day and the Procession of The Species parade and Arts Walk.   The book is an art form – not to be missed.

From Amazon:

Jeannine Hall Gailey recently served as the Poet Laureate of Redmond, Washington. She is the author of four books of poetry: Becoming the Villainess, She Returns to the Floating World, Unexplained Fevers and The Robot Scientist’s Daughter. Her poems have been featured on NPR’s The Writer’s Almanac and on Verse Daily; two were included in 2007’s The Year’s Best Fantasy and Horror. She was awarded a 2007 and 2011 Dorothy Sargent Rosenberg Prize for Poetry and a 2007 Washington State Artist Trust GAP grant. Her poems have appeared in American Poetry Review, The Iowa Review, and Prairie Schooner.

I feel privileged to have been given this book for review by Serena at  Poetic Book Tours

I apologize to Jeannine Hall Gailey for being a day late on posting this review of her magnificent book, but I too have spent a lifetime of working on health and living with a Downwinder of the Hanford Nuclear Release!  Some days are just impossible to manage.   We’re here now and so thankful for knowing of your book and wisdom.
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