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LIE TO ME: A Domestic Noir Novel ~J. T. Ellison

Monday, September 25th, 2017

“LIE TO ME is Domestic noir at its best. Readers will devour this stunning page-turner about the disintegration of a marriage as grief, jealousy, betrayal and murder destroy the façade of the perfect literary couple.  New York Times bestselling author J.T. Ellison takes her exceptional writing to a new level with this breakout novel”(Cover)

LIE TO ME is a seductive story about a marriage and all the lies and omissions that are overwhelming Sutton and Nathan Montclair’s lives.  They are writers and they are the beautiful people and everyone believes them to be wealthy and perfect.  After the death of their 4-month-old son, SIDS, the couple begins to experience a love/hate relationship and the neighbors call in some domestic violence reports. Oh! Oh! It looks like Sutton made the calls.  Now a blogger has started attacking Sutton’s latest book and the rants and discussions on his blog have gotten her current contract cancelled.  Nathan has severe writer’s block and his agent is demanding more material.   $50,000 has been moved out of their accounts.  What is going on?

Sutton decides to disappear and take a time out and Nathan thinks something has happened to her and is harassed and finally arrested for the possible murder of his wife.   The path to answers is so twisted and is spinning out of control and the couple can feel the love and the confusion right to their core.

The writing in this story is amazing and all the t’s are crossed and all the i’s dotted and the pace is astounding.  The reader is caught in the story and webbed in place and I dare someone to put the book down and not read it to the last page.  Folks who thought GONE GIRL was fabulous will like this story to the max.  As I said it is so well written and driven.

tlc-logo

“New York Times and USA Today bestselling author J.T. Ellison writes standalone domestic noir and psychological thriller series, the latter starring Nashville Homicide Lt. Taylor Jackson and medical examiner Dr. Samantha Owens, and pens the international thriller series “A Brit in the FBI” with #1 New York Times bestselling author Catherine Coulter. Cohost of the Emmy Award-winning show, A Word on Words, Ellison lives in Nashville with her husband. “

I need to confess.  I truly do not like reading these kinds of dark stories.  I like a good mystery and this was certainly a good mystery, and yet, I feel as though so many awful things happen to people that we do not need more of this horrid stuff to read.  I tried to set aside the book everyday and truly had to force myself to read it cover to cover.  I was relieved when I got to the conclusion.  I could not read this book before bedtime, as I would end up trying to resolve the story in my sleep.  I just cannot watch horror movies and “the world is ending” scary stories.  I agreed to read this story for TLC Book Tours, I believe it will be a best seller and I do know one person in my book group that I want to give my copy.  I am thankful I am done with it.

Related Reading:
Disintegration
The Organ Takers
The Forever Man

A TALE FOR THE TIME BEING: A Novel ~ Ruth Ozeki

Monday, December 5th, 2016

A nearly perfect read, which came into my awareness with nearly perfect timing, and gave me a nearly perfect excuse to do nothing else except read; Exquisite.

The story begins with a 16-year-old girls voice saying:  “Hi! My name is Nao, and I am a time being. Do you know what a time being is?  Well, if you give me a moment, I will tell you.” This child’s story is compelling and sometimes funny and sometimes very difficult.  Nao is trying to figure out life and how to live it after having been living the “good” life in California and now whisked back to Japan in the dot com bust.   Her father is extremely depressed and it is affecting the whole family.  The guilt, the anger, the shame is difficult to understand and yet it draws one into the story.  The bullying and shaming that Nao must endure is horrific.

There is a second story that takes place on an island on the British Columbia Coastline.   Ruth, a writer, is wandering the beach and finds a “Hello Kitty” lunch pail in a heavy plastic shipping bag.  When opened the lunch pail contains a journal and a Kamikaze pilot’s letters and watch, it appears to be debris from the Japanese tsunami of 2011.  It is Nao’s journal and her story and history.

The story is also about the Zen experience of life as shared by Nao’s lessons from her 104 year old great grandmother, who is the mother of the Kamikaze pilot.  How can there be humor in such a story?  There is a great deal of humor in the story.  The characters on the island truly come alive and participate in the story.  Ruth and her partner Oliver are strong characters in their own right.  Fact and fiction twirl about as compliments to understanding the deeper issues facing each person-culture.  Is Nao still alive and well?  How could this person be tracked down and could they all be on the Internet?

My book group chose this book and so it is apart of my own library.  The other members of the group discovered that there was a reader’s play of this story being performed in the city and they bought tickets and went to the performance.  We cannot stop talking about this book and we all agree that there is perfection in the writing of this story, which makes it a huge recommendation and a must read for so many people I know.    I just had to share it with you

Bursting with symbolism, a story for our time – full of topics to discuss; breaks the barriers and expectations of traditional thinking.

Ruth Ozeki Webpage
Ruth Ozeki Twitter

From the website:

“Ruth Ozeki is a novelist, filmmaker, and Zen Buddhist priest.Her first two novels, My Year of Meats(1998) and All Over Creation (2003), have been translated into 11 languages and published in 14 countries. Her most recent work, A Tale for the Time-Being (2013), won the LA Times Book Prize, was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and the National Book Critic’s Circle Award, and has been published in over thirty countries. Ruth’s documentary and dramatic independent films, including Halving the Bones, have been shown on PBS, at the Sundance Film Festival, and at colleges and universities across the country. A longtime Buddhist practitioner, Ruth was ordained in 2010 and is affiliated with the Brooklyn Zen Center and the Everyday Zen Foundation. She lives in British Columbia and New York City, and is currently the Elizabeth Drew Professor of Creative Writing at Smith College.”

“Tantalizing”– The Washington Post
“A spellbinding tale.” – O, The Oprah Magazine
“Fractures Clichés” – ELLE
“Delightful.” – The New York Times Book Review
“Terrific”– The Seattle Times

Related:
Breakfast with Buddha
Lunch with Buddha
A Piece of Sky, A Grain of Sand