Home Recommended Reading Workshops About RSS

Posts Tagged ‘chemistry’

ADOLFO KAMINSKY A FORGER’S LIFE: A Memoir ~Sarah Kaminsky (Translated by Mike Mitchell)

Monday, November 21st, 2016

“Already published in six languages to a global audience, ADOLFO KAMINSKY A FORGER’S LIFE, critics have called it riveting, thrilling, precise and touching, written like one of the best spy novels, and one of the most captivating books of the year.”(From publicity sheet – Meryl Zegarek Public Relations, Inc.  www.mzpr.com )

Imagine a young boy, a Russian Jew exiled to Argentina and now immigrating to France with his family as the Nazi regime is taking over the countryside.  The boy is allowed some time to attend school and he becomes fascinated with chemistry – helped by a Pharmacist he is able to study and learn.  Then his mother dies, and he must go to work as a dyer (coloring fabric) and here he learns even more chemistry.  The family is rounded up and confined but their Argentinian paperwork keeps them from being shipped to the death camps.  Adolfo Kaminsky is now sixteen and alone and as he finds his way he is brought into the resistance movement and learns how to forge papers and passports.  He learns how to create the machines they need to print the documents and how to age and distress the paper and the forms.

He is also learning photography and development of film.  He worked underground with a team and is meticulous about not being followed and remained invisible.  He was never arrested over his career though he did have to dash away a number of times and move his point of operations many times.  He would not take any money for his efforts and work – never paid.  He was always inventing and selling his photographs as a front to keep going.   He created paperwork for the homeless concentration camps survivors to enter Palestine and create settlements.  When WWII was over his efforts continued for the next thirty years to help all oppressed people, including the Algerian Freedom Fighters even Pacifists in the United States during the Viet Nam War.

Sarah Kaminsky, the youngest daughter, listened to her father dictate this story when he was nearly 80 years old.  They as a team were able to meet and interview many of the people who were part of the story.  When the book was published, the team of father and daughter began to speak at schools and tell the story to young people who were the same age as the young boy who taught himself chemistry and learned how to forge all the paperwork.  This is a riveting story of a non-violent hero of a huge war and a self-effacing, creative voice for the oppressed.  It is a best seller in eleven countries and is now translated into English.

“Sarah Kaminsky (b.1979 in Sidi M’hamed, Algeria) is a French actor, screenwriter and author.  She was three years old when she immigrated to France with her father Adolfo, who is of Russian Jewish origins, carrying an Argentinean passport, and with her mother Lei..la, a Tuareg Algerian.  Sarah Kaminsky is currently employed as a screenwriter at several production companies in France.  She lives in Paris.”

“Mike Mitchell (b. Rochdale, England) has been active as a translator from German-English and French-English for over thirty years.  He is the recipient of the Schlegel-Tieck Prize for translations of German works published in Britain, has won the British Comparative Literature Association translation competition three times, and has been shortlisted for numerous other awards.  In 2012 the Austrian Ministry of Education, Art and Culture awarded him a lifetime achievement award as a translator of literary works.  He lives in Scotland.”

This book was a remarkable read and on the top of my list to share with others.

Related
Gone to Soldiers
Autumn in Oxford
The Boys in the Boat
Sarah Kaminsky TED Talk
Sarah Kaminsky Wikipedia

MY SISTER’S GRAVE: A Legal Thriller ~Robert Dugoni

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

“’There is nothing so dangerous as a maxim’. –C.J.May   Some Rules of Evidence: Reasonable Doubt in Civil and Criminal Cases (1876)” (Location 49% of uncorrected proof)

The most important part of MY SISTER’S GRAVE for me was the story about how a disappearance and murder affects a family and a whole community.  The relationship between sisters and the after affects upon the remaining child, are examined from a different perspective and demonstrate that manipulations do not produce the loving truth or freedom from danger.  Those secrets drive a good story and often produce an even scarier scenario – the melodramatic conclusion of the story just kept me glued to the very last drop in the bucket.

I do not have a book cover for this book, so I will share MY SISTER’S GRAVE description from Amazon:
Tracy Crosswhite has spent twenty years questioning the facts surrounding her sister Sarah’s disappearance and the murder trial that followed. She doesn’t believe that Edmund House—a convicted rapist and the man condemned for Sarah’s murder—is the guilty party. Motivated by the opportunity to obtain real justice, Tracy became a homicide detective with the Seattle PD and dedicated her life to tracking down killers.

When Sarah’s remains are finally discovered near their hometown in the northern Cascade Mountains of Washington State, Tracy is determined to get the answers she’s been seeking. As she searches for the real killer, she unearths dark, long-kept secrets that will forever change her relationship to her past—and open the door to deadly danger.

TLC Booktours   sent me an unproofed, uncorrected e-copy of this book for review.  I appreciated the read very much and enjoyed reading MY SISTER’S GRAVE

Here is the Author’s Biography from Amazon:

“Robert Dugoni is the critically acclaimed and New York Times–bestselling author of the David Sloane series: The Jury Master, Wrongful Death, Bodily Harm, Murder One, and The Conviction. Murder One was a finalist for the Harper Lee Award for literary excellence. Dugoni is also the author of the bestselling standalone novel Damage Control, and his nonfiction exposé, The Cyanide Canary, was a Washington Post Best Book of the Year selection. Dugoni’s books have been likened to Scott Turow and Nelson DeMille, and he has been hailed as “the undisputed king of the legal thriller” by The Providence Journal.”

The final copy of the book has just been released and the words of praise are mounting up for this suspenseful book – just like the snow in the North Cascades on the final pages. It takes place in a fictional town in Washington State and it is always fun to know the territories and the qualities of the communities being described and experienced.

I had a bit of trouble with the story at the beginning, whereas THE FIXER took place in Washington State, it was highlighting sexual abuse particularly of foster children and our incredible Children’s Justice Center and responsibilities.  I felt this story was confusing at the start (maybe because of the spelling errors with an unproofed copy) but I could not find the life flow – the value – within the story except by the attacking the victim behavior, which was very unenlightened and protective of the sexual perpetrator.  Tracy, the family survivor, was under nearly constant attack and threat for her life, her work, and even her community. She is a scientist and needs to know and search for true answers.  I just had to stop for half a day and take a deep breath; I had to be angry about the abuse heaped on our President, upon myself, the constant jibs and jabs at the lead character and the profound loneliness of trying to survive in that environment and stay true to the self and values.   There was an element where all the female victims were to blame for their tragedy, which became overwhelming.  I had to drag myself back to reading this book and finally cheer the truth creating a real freedom and release – a moment of loving sex also benefited this tale – oh! To be believed and supported.

 Robert Dugoni Online

Related:
The Fixer
The Condor Song
The Highest Tide
The Contractors