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THE MIND-GUT CONNECTION: How the Hidden Conversation Within Our Bodies Impacts Our Mood, Our Choices, and Our Overall Health ~Emeran Mayer, MD

Friday, July 8th, 2016

I love to eat raspberries and it is my love of raspberries that made me want to read this book.  To me raspberries are nearly perfect food from the delight they pose to my tongue all the way as they travel through the GI track, bringing usable fiber and seeds of joy to my brain.  My pro-biotic and my raspberries just make my system work well and I feel well and thus happy.

In the MIND -GUT CONNECTION Dr. Mayer decodes the GI track and introduces a whole range of microbes that keep our systems healthy and strong.  New studies and research are revealed, which have been found to heal and soothe and bring happiness.  There is mention of lots of new medications and lots of studies about the rising incidence of Irritable Bowel Syndrome and even autism relationships but this book is not primarily about how to cure the problems, rather it is suggesting the cause for the problems and how neglecting gut health produces severe problem.

Dr. Mayer is defining glowing Overall Health and how to understand and heal when a bump distracts from you progress.  He is very concerned about our environments, our lifestyles, and our self-care.  I am sure he would stress organic foods and simple foods first.   I heard a famous chef once say one should eat organic veggies and fruit 5 days a week, then one day of anything you want and one day to modify back into the 5 day routine.   I think this was what Dr. Mayer was describing only through using a Mediterranean Diet.

What stress does to our GI track is quite alarming and scary.  We truly need to take time to eat and not mix eating with other activities.  We need not sit down to eat when we are angry and we need to take time to calm our insides and ourselves before we begin eating.  Even better is to eat with friends or relatives and feel a sense of contentment and happiness.

The microbes in our GI track are crucial to our staving off Alzheimer’s, Obesity, and Parkinson’s Disease and his recommendations for pre-natal care and eating are very good.   We know that now the Gut is considered the Second Brain for our bodies and I think Dr. Mayer would say it is the first as it has a profound role in our brain activities, and thinking skills, not  to mention our emotional health.

This book is full of myth busters and really has the straight skinny.  It is ease to read and gentle with explanations.  When I was in the hospital recently for test, every nurse and OT and PT who came to see me picked up and looked at the book.  I said it was good and as one nurse said: “I think this is vital information and better than thinking a cup of pro-biotic yogurt will bring all back to health.”

TLC Book Tours sent me an uncorrected proof copy of this book to review.  It is well worth it to get to the truth and find a healthy balance to achieve optimal health.  It is all the health knowledge along with all the directives that my daughter just paid $200 for a Dr. appointment prescription for the exact same information.  Very worthwhile investment.

Cover:

Dr. Emeran Mayer previously served as the founding chair of the UCLA Collaborative Centers for Integrative Medicine, as the executive director of the UCLA Center for Neuro-biology of Stress, and as the codirector of the CURE: Digestive Diseases Research Center.  He has joint appointments in the departments of Medicine, Physiology, and Psychiatry.  His work has appeared in the NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF MEDICINE and has been featured in PSHYCHOLOGY TODAY, NEW YORK TIMES, THE SUNDAY TIMES (LONDON) and on NPR and PBS.  He lives in Los Angeles, California

Related:
Sugar Crush
Healing and Prevention through Nutrition
Eat To Live

THE EAGLE TREE: The Remarkable Story of A Boy and A Tree ~Ned Hayes

Wednesday, June 1st, 2016

An environmental love story, takes place in my hometown, is a great voice for autism and potential.  Peter March Wong is a fourteen-year-old boy who loves to climb trees – at least 3 everyday.  He is a walking encyclopedia of knowledge about trees and he is a gifted scientist.

March and his mother have moved into a smaller house, because Dad has moved to Arizona.  This move is very unsettling to March and he needs to climb a tree, a very tall tree.  He does not follow the rules because he discovers an extremely tall, old tree in the distance, when he was up in the new neighbor’s tree.  He spent too long up in the tree and his mother is worried and concerned….everything is new and different…. March explodes into a screaming and hand flapping experience and the police arrive to take him to a hospital for observation.  Now March needs to learn new behaviors as he comes into adulthood and in order to stay with his mother.

The huge EAGLE TREE is also under attack, as a developer wants to clear-cut the area and put up houses and apartments right at that very spot.

“Intertwining themes of humanity and ecology, THE EAGLE TREE eloquently explores what it means to be part of a family, a society, and the natural world that surrounds and connects us.” (cover)

I so enjoyed the comments in the book that praised our wonderful schools and the commitment to assisting children to be their best.  March’s mother will not move to Arizona because there are no programs like here and no commitment to education for all.  Washington State has amazing schools.

I knew nothing about this book when TLC Book Tours sent me a copy for review. I am so pleased to share this story with you.  It was a wonderful read; a hopeful read.

The Librarian I was working with last week said he had the book on his list and he was #15 for check out; he could hardly wait for his turn.

I want to share two cover quotes that I believe are significant in sharing this book with others:

“Every human experience is unique, but THE EAGLE TREE provides insight into one distinctive and uniquely important perspective.  The descriptions of climbing in EAGLE TREE get deep into the mathematical pattern-based sensory world of a person with autism.  The experience of navigating a tree climb is described in detail with mathematical and sensory detail that seems very authentic to me.” Temple Grandin, Ph.D.

“A gorgeously written novel that features one of the most accurate, finely drawn and memorable autistic protagonists in literature.  The hero of the book is like a 14-year-old Walt Whitman with autism.  Credible, authentic, powerful.”  Steve Silberman, author of NeuroTribes: The Legacy of Autism and the Future of Neurodiversity.

I enjoyed every single page of this book and cheered for March’s growth, passion, and determination.  This book should be required reading at least for our whole city and will bring a sense of pride and button popping spirit for our community and our efforts in behalf of our natural resources.

From the cover:

“Ned Hayes holds an MFA in creative writing from the Rainier Writing Workshop at Pacific Lutheran University.  THE EAGLE TREE is based on his past experience working with children on the autistic spectrum and on family and friends he knows and loves.  Hayes lives in Olympia, Washington, with his wife and children.”

Ned Hayes Facebook
Ned Hayes Webpage

Related:
Temple Grandin
Integrity
When Women Were Birds

LANGUAGE ARTS: A Novel ~Stephanie Kallos

Monday, October 12th, 2015

LANGUAGE ARTS was what English and Spelling and Writing was called when I was in elementary school.   It involved The Palmer Method of learning to write cursive and when I was in 4th grade I won a prize for my beautiful penmanship.  It was one of the only prizes I won during my school years, and I have always been proud of my lovely lettering ability until now when my hand shakes so dramatically and it is hard to hold a pen or pencil; typing is easier and dictating even better.   This is a story about the Palmer Method and a teacher who teaches LANGUAGE ARTS in Seattle, Washington.  The author captures a great deal of what it was like in my elementary school and how it has changed currently.

This is not Kallos’ latest book, but I have had it on my Kindle for a while, well, until my book group decided to read it this autumn and I delightedly opened it up.  This book touched me in so many ways, I am sure and certain that I will read it several more times and I am delighted to refer you to this read.

One of the members of my book group described the book at weird; maybe I would use that word also in the beginning of the read.  The writing just drew me in and the compelling nature of the story and the similarity to my own experience just wrapped the story into me and I was part of the tale and part of the life of Charles, the boy doing the Palmer Method and winning the prize and the man teaching students now and doing the best that he is able to do.  Did I tell you how much I appreciated the writing and the play full words and sentences in this story?

Yes, the story is a bit confusing but isn’t that how love is when it is real?  Are we not all searching for love, acceptance and appreciation?  How did you recognize love when it came your way?  Was it obvious and over the moon?  Did you need to contemplate and have a glass of wine?  Were you just born into the feeling?

This is the story of the disintegration of a family when they are caring for a special needs child.  I know the exhaustion in my very bones and the constant search for feelings of appreciation and affirmation.  I know how and why it destroys families and pits one against another.   I liked that the story was in Seattle, Washington and that the rain was real and the schools were like/are like that, and that family dynamics are what they are.  The disintegration process has a chaos stage that is well articulated in this finely written story.  LANGUAGE ARTS really is a love story.

And as the confusion flattens out into the linear events of the current ebb and flow of the present tense, I cried and was touched very deeply.  The story distilled into its own truth; the loneliness of my own story made loops around me and I wondered what I would do next as the words amazed me and filled me up.  I was content with my own story and my own love.

“Stephanie Kallos is the author of the national bestseller BROKEN FOR YOU, which was selected by Sue Monk Kidd for the TODAY book club, and SING THEM HOME one of Entertainment Weekly’s ten best novels of the year.  She lives in Seattle with her family.”  (from the book)

Related:
When Women Were Birds
The Signature of All Things
Animal Dreams

10 Steps To Finding Your Happy Place – my gift to you

Monday, December 17th, 2012

Every year at this time I experience huge numbers of fundraisers.  Actually, the season starts almost right after Labor Day in September.  Most of the gifts folks receive from me are things I purchased at fundraisers and they match up with the recipient.  I have spent years of my life selling items to raise funds for Women’s Education, a college, animals, sewing cooperatives, children’s justice issues, women’s shelters, cancer, seniors, health concerns and other treatments, choirs, bands, sports groups, scouting programs, homeless shelter, food banks and the Hands On Children’s Museum – just to mention this year’s list.

Galen Pearl’s lovely book is a fundraiser for the Edwards Center  in Portland, a residential center for folks with Autism, which is home base for her two sons.

10 Steps to Finding Your Happy Place (and staying there) is such a well written, linear, book of sharing about just how to find and change into the happy person you were meant to become.  I have read her blog posts and the Facebook page, and her words have wisdom from so many traditions, shared with stories which truly illustrate and make comprehensive the lessons that she is sharing for this particular journey.  The quotes actually fit the stories, tell the ancient secrets, and are very appropriate; timely. Not a “woo woo” read.   I have purchased several copies of this book to give as gifts this holiday season to family members.

I have purchased a copy of 10 Steps to Finding Your Happy Place (and staying there) for some lucky person to receive as my gift this holiday season to you my lovely readers.  I can think of nothing more wonderful to share with you than happiness and how to find contentment when one arrives there.   I wish I could give each of my readers their own copy to say thank you for reading, commenting and sharing my words.   Maybe this will spark an interest in supporting this fundraiser – maybe the recipient and readers will spread the word?

 

candy_caneHappy Holidays to each and every one of you.
Thank you for all your support in 2012.
May we each be blessed with a happy, health new year.

I am taking a two week break from writing blog posts to prepare for all the company that is coming to my home and to begin work on 2013.  I will come by and check on and reply to comments and get caught up on my blog reading.  I invite you to browse through the recommended reading tab or the table of contents and see if there are other posts which might bring a bit of happiness to you too.

If you purchase anything from Amazon or Powell’s   from this site, I will receive a few beans in my bucket.  Thank you.  Donations welcome too.

No one offered me any remuneration for this gift and I was not given a free copy of this book.  This is from my own library.

 

 

Galen Pearl

Galen’s blog

10 Steps Book on Facebook

Galen on Facebook

Portland, Oregon Autism Research Guide

 

Related Reading:
Peace and Joy Come to You
Lighting the Candles with Music
To Serve the Season
Happy Holidays from the Folks at Patricia’s Wisdom